New Updates in nRP

We have been working out quite a lot improvements in nRP, the web radio belonging to this website. Besides a broadcasting now covering the whole day, many other new authors and music styles have been included in our playlists.

Furthermore, nRP is now subscribing a couple of good web radio directories, listed in `About nRP`, which are giving us more visibility all over the world. Go on, try this nice eclectic `made in Portugal` web radio. With just a couple of clicks you’ll be next to heaven’s door. Once there, let us know how much happiness our web radio brings to you…

May the gods be with you…

nRP under Maintenance

Some software updating is in process on nRP’s server which makes impossible to have all functionality 100% up and running. Meanwhile, SHOUTcast website is still up and running and nobody knows what AOL will do with SHOUTcast after their decision of terminating Winamp.

Let’s wait and see…

nRP presents Led Zeppelin

Led Zeppelin was the definitive heavy metal band. It wasn’t just their crushingly loud interpretation of the blues — it was how they incorporated mythology, mysticism, and a variety of other genres (most notably world music and British folk) — into their sound. Led Zeppelin had mystique. They rarely gave interviews, since the music press detested the band. Consequently, the only connection the audience had with the band was through the records and the concerts. More than any other band, Led Zeppelin established the concept of album-oriented rock, refusing to release popular songs from their albums as singles. In doing so, they established the dominant format for heavy metal, as well as the genre’s actual sound.

Led Zeppelin formed out of the ashes of the Yardbirds. Jimmy Page had joined the band in its final days, playing a pivotal role on their final album, 1967’s Little Games, which also featured string arrangements from John Paul Jones. During 1967, the Yardbirds were fairly inactive. While the Yardbirds decided their future, Page returned to session work in 1967. In the spring of 1968, he played on Jones’ arrangement of Donovan’s “Hurdy Gurdy Man.” During the sessions, Jones requested to be part of any future project Page would develop. Page would have to assemble a band sooner than he had planned. In the summer of 1968, the Yardbirds’ Keith Relf and James McCarty left the band, leaving Page and bassist Chris Dreja with the rights to the name, as well as the obligation of fulfilling an upcoming fall tour. Page set out to find a replacement vocalist and drummer. Initially, he wanted to enlist singer Terry Reid and Procol Harum’s drummer B.J. Wilson, but neither musician was able to join the group. Reid suggested that Page contact Robert Plant, who was singing with a band called Hobbstweedle.

After hearing him sing, Page asked Plant to join the band in August of 1968, the same month Chris Dreja dropped out of the new project. Following Dreja’s departure, John Paul Jones joined the group as its bassist. Plant recommended that Page hire John Bonham, the drummer for Plant’s old band, the Band of Joy. Bonham had to be persuaded to join the group, as he was being courted by other artists who offered the drummer considerably more money. By September, Bonham agreed to join the band. Performing under the name the New Yardbirds, the band fulfilled the Yardbirds’ previously booked engagements in late September 1968. The following month, they recorded their debut album in just under 30 hours. Also in October, the group switched its name to Led Zeppelin. The band secured a contract with Atlantic Records in the United States before the end of the year. Early in 1969, Led Zeppelin set out on their first American tour, which helped set the stage for the January release of their eponymous debut album. Two months after its release, Led Zeppelin had climbed into the U.S. Top Ten. Throughout 1969, the band toured relentlessly, playing dates in America and England. While they were on the road, they recorded their second album, Led Zeppelin II, which was released in October of 1969. Like its predecessor, Led Zeppelin II was an immediate hit, topping the American charts two months after its release and spending seven weeks at number one. The album helped establish Led Zeppelin as an international concert attraction, and for the next year, the group continued to tour relentlessly. Led Zeppelin’s sound began to deepen with Led Zeppelin III. Released in October of 1970, the album featured an overt British folk influence. The group’s infatuation with folk and mythology would reach a fruition on the group’s untitled fourth album, which was released in November of 1971. Led Zeppelin IV was the band’s most musically diverse effort to date, featuring everything from the crunching rock of “Black Dog” to the folk of “The Battle of Evermore,” as well as “Stairway to Heaven,” which found the bridge between the two genres. “Stairway to Heaven” was an immediate radio hit, eventually becoming the most played song in the history of album-oriented radio; the song was never released as a single. Despite the fact that the album never reached number one in America, Led Zeppelin IV was their biggest album ever, selling well over 16 million copies over the next two and a half decades.

Led Zeppelin did tour to support both Led Zeppelin III and Led Zeppelin IV, but they played fewer shows than they did on their previous tours. Instead, they concentrated on only playing larger venues. After completing their 1972 tour, the band retreated from the spotlight and recorded their fifth album. Released in the spring of 1973, Houses of the Holy continued the band’s musical experimentation, featuring touches of funk and reggae among their trademark rock and folk. The success of Houses of the Holy set the stage for a record-breaking American tour. Throughout their 1973 tour, Led Zeppelin broke box-office records — most of which were previously held by the Beatles — across America. The group’s concert at Madison Square Garden in July was filmed for use in the feature film The Song Remains the Same, which was released three years later. After their 1973 tour, Led Zeppelin spent a quiet year during 1974, releasing no new material and performing no concerts. They did, however, establish their own record label, Swan Song, which released all of Led Zeppelin’s subsequent albums, as well as records by Dave Edmunds, Bad Company, the Pretty Things, and several others. Physical Graffiti, a double album released in February of 1975, was the band’s first release on Swan Song. The album was an immediate success, topping the charts in both America and England. Led Zeppelin launched a large American tour in 1975, but it came to a halt when Robert Plant and his wife suffered a serious car crash while vacationing in Greece. The tour was canceled and Plant spent the rest of the year recuperating from the accident.

Led Zeppelin returned to action in the spring of 1976 with Presence. Although the album debuted at number one in both America and England, the reviews for the album were lukewarm, as was the reception to the live concert film The Song Remains the Same, which appeared in the fall of 1976. The band finally returned to tour America in the Spring of 1977. A couple of months into the tour, Plant’s six-year-old son Karac died of a stomach infection. Led Zeppelin immediately canceled the tour and offered no word whether or not it would be rescheduled, causing widespread speculation about the band’s future. For a while, it did appear that Led Zeppelin was finished. Robert Plant spent the latter half of 1977 and the better part of 1978 in seclusion. The group didn’t begin work on a new album until late in the summer of 1978, when they began recording at ABBA’s Polar studios in Sweden. A year later, the band played a short European tour, performing in Switzerland, Germany, Holland, Belgium, and Austria. In August of 1979, Led Zeppelin played two large concerts at Knebworth; the shows would be their last English performances.

In Through the Out Door, the band’s much-delayed eighth studio album, was finally released in September of 1979. The album entered the charts at number one in both America and England. In May of 1980, Led Zeppelin embarked on their final European tour. In September, Led Zeppelin began rehearsing at Jimmy Page’s house in preparation for an American tour. On September 25, John Bonham was found dead in his bed — following an all-day drinking binge, he had passed out and choked on his own vomit. In December of 1980, Led Zeppelin announced they were disbanding, since they could not continue without Bonham.

Following the breakup, the remaining members all began solo careers. John Paul Jones returned to producing and arranging, finally releasing his solo debut, Zooma, in 1999. After recording the soundtrack for Death Wish II, Jimmy Page compiled the Zeppelin outtakes collection Coda, which was released at the end of 1982. That same year, Robert Plant began a solo career with the Pictures at Eleven album. In 1984, Plant and Page briefly reunited in the all-star oldies band the Honeydrippers. After recording one EP with the Honeydrippers, Plant returned to his solo career and Page formed the Firm with former Bad Company singer Paul Rogers. In 1985, Led Zeppelin reunited to play Live Aid, sparking off a flurry of reunion rumors; the reunion never materialized. In 1988, the band re-formed to play Atlantic’s 25th anniversary concert. During 1989, Page remastered the band’s catalog for release on the 1990 box set Led Zeppelin. The four-disc set became the biggest-selling multi-disc box set of all time, which was followed up three years later by another box set, the mammoth ten-disc set The Complete Studio Recordings.

In 1994, Page and Plant reunited to record a segment for MTV Unplugged, which was released as No Quarter in the fall of 1994. Although the album went platinum, the sales were disappointing considering the anticipation of a Zeppelin reunion. The following year, Page and Plant embarked on a successful international tour, which eventually led to an all-new studio recording in 1998, the Steve Albini-produced Walking Into Clarksdale. Surprisingly, the album was met with a cool reception by the record-buying public, as Page and Plant ended their union shortly thereafter, once again going their separate ways (Page went on to tour with the Black Crowes, while Plant resumed his solo career). Further Zeppelin compilation releases saw the light of day in the late ’90s, including 1997’s stellar double-disc BBC Sessions, plus Zep’s first true best-of collections — 1999’s Early Days: The Best Of, Vol. 1 and 2000’s Latter Days: The Best Of, Vol. 2.

© Previous text by Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

by Led Zeppelin
Whole Lotta Love, in Led Zeppelin II, © 1969
Video clip created/edited by unknown.

nRP presents Tindersticks

Tindersticks were one of the most original and distinctive British acts of the ’90s, standing apart from both the British indie scene and the rash of Brit-pop guitar combos that dominated the U.K. charts.

Where their contemporaries were often direct and to the point, Tindersticks were obtuse and leisurely, crafting dense, difficult songs layered with literary lyrics, intertwining melodies, mumbling vocals, and gently melancholy orchestrations. Essentially, the group filtered the dark romanticism of Leonard Cohen, Ian Curtis, and Scott Walker as filtered through the bizarre pop songcraft of Lee Hazlewood and the aesthetics of indie rock. Though their music was far from casual listening, Tindersticks gained a dedicated cult following in the mid-’90s, beginning with their eponymous 1993 debut album, which was named Album of the Year by Melody Maker.

The origins of Tindersticks lay in Asphalt Ribbons, a Nottingham-based indie rock band that featured vocalist Stuart Staples, keyboardist David Boulter, and violinist Dickon Hinchcliffe. All three members formed Tindersticks in 1992; the remaining members included guitarist Neil Fraser, bassist Mark Colwill, and drummer Al Macaulay. In November of 1992, the band released its first single, “Patchwork,” on its own label, Tippy Toe. “Marbles” followed early in 1993, as did “A Marriage Made in Heaven,” a collaboration with Huggy Bear’s Niki Sin that appeared on Rough Trade’s Singles Club. Following the release of the Unwired EP on Tippy Toe, the fledgling This Way Up signed the band.

Tindersticks’ eponymous debut appeared halfway through 1993, earning rave reviews from most sections of the British press. By the end of the year, the group and the album had won over most of the U.K. critics, and Tindersticks was named Album of the Year by Melody Maker. Tindersticks spent a quiet year in 1994, releasing a single of John Barry’s James Bond theme “We Have All the Time in the World” (On Her Majesty’s Secret Service), a live album entitled Amsterdam, and a cover of Pavement’s “Here.” Also that year, Tindersticks was released on Bar/None in the U.S.

In the spring of 1995, the group released its untitled second album, which featured cameos from Gallon Drunk’s Terry Edwards and the Walkabouts’ Carla Torgerson. Like its predecessor, it received rave reviews and appeared on nearly every British Top Ten list of the Best of 1995. In November of 1995, the group released another live album, Bloomsbury Theatre.

Tindersticks were quiet for most of 1996, releasing the soundtrack to the Claire Denis film Nénette et Boni in the fall of the year. The album was comprised of old songs, new songs, and rearranged older material. A new version of “A Marriage Made in Heaven,” featuring vocals from actress Isabella Rossellini, was released a few months after Nénette et Boni; the single was later appended to the American release of 1997’s Curtains. Their fourth effort, Simple Pleasure (1999), marked the band’s most open-hearted release since their inception. A new deal with Beggars Banquet surfaced at the dawn of the new millennium, and a replenished unity within the band was found on 2001’s Can Our Love…. Later that year, Tindersticks provided the soundtrack to another Claire Denis film, Trouble Every Day. The proper follow-up to Can Our Love…, Waiting for the Moon, was released in mid-2003.

In 2005, Staples embarked on a solo project (fueling rumors of a split) and went on to produce two albums. The rumors proved to be partially true as Hinchcliffe, Colwill, and drummer Macaulay left the group in 2006. The remaining Tindersticks (Staples, Fraser and Boulter) were joined by long-time associate Terry Edwards and a host of musicians in their return to the studio in 2007. The resulting album, The Hungry Saw, was released in 2008, followed two years later by Falling Down a Mountain. The latter album introduced another revised lineup, this one featuring Earl Harvin on drums, and David Kitt on guitar.

The Tindersticks long collaboration with Claire Denis,in film and television was compiled by Constellation into a limited edition five CD (or five LP) package entitled The Claire Denis Film Scores 1996-2009, which was released in April of 2011. The band planned tour the material in the U.K. in the fall of that year. Recorded between May 2010 and August 2011, Tindersticks’ ninth studio album featured, appropriately, nine brand new cuts, including the hypnotic first single, “Medicine”. The Something Rain was released on February 21, 2012.

© Text by Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

nRP presents T G Albinoni

Tomaso Giovanni Albinoni was the son of a well-to-do Italian businessman enabling Tomaso to live the life of an aristocrat (and almost the life of a dandy).

He studied both violin and singing, treating instrumental music and opera well 1. It is difficult to assess whether Albinoni’s vocal music will continue in the performing arts; it does seem likely since many of his early works were operas though style and innovation are lacking. His operas, intermezzos and small stage works include “Zenobia, Regina de’ Palmireni,” “Artamene,” “Rodrigo in Algeri,” “I veri amici,” “Il trionfo dell’amore,” “Vespetta e Pimpinone,” “Griselda,” “Aminita,” and “Engleberta.” His production was fierce although the latter operas seem to have been received better than the former.

Albinoni described “Candilade” (one of his last operas) as his eightieth though this was quite possibly an exaggeration on his part. Only forty are catalogued! He had also made the claim that he worked for the Duke of Mantua which is unlikely.

Albinoni composed numerous sonatas, concertos, sinfonias and some cantatas. His instrumental works will survive as he can be juxtaposed comparably with the likes of Corelli, Vivaldi and Mascitti (at least for his day). Albinoni’s music can be characterized somewhat cryptically regarding variation. His production was so quantitative that it is easy to discern a boorish pattern from which he did not stray. However, he was the first to employ three movements on a regular basis, the first Italian to compose an oboe concerto (for two oboes), and his singular concepts for melodic lines are clearly demarcated by the use of single-stepped interval phrases rather than arpeggios.

© Text by Keith Johnson, Rovi

  1. Albinoni was not able to successfully deal with sacred music.

nRP presents J S Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach is considered by many people to have been the greatest composer in the history of Western music.

Bach’s main achievement lies in his synthesis and advanced development of the primary contrapuntal idiom of the late Baroque, and in the basic tunefulness of his thematic material. He was able to successfully integrate and expand upon the harmonic and formal frameworks of the national schools of the time: German, French, Italian, and English, while retaining a personal identity and spirit in his large output.

Bach is also known for the numerical symbolism and mathematical exactitude which many people have found in his music – for this, he is often regarded as one of the pinnacle geniuses of Western civilization, even by those who are not normally involved with music.

Bach spent the height of his working life in a Lutheran church position in Leipzig, as both organist and music director. Much of his music is overtly religious, while many of his secular works admit religious interpretations on some levels. His large output of organ music is considered to be the greatest legacy of compositions for the instrument, and it is the measure by which all later efforts are judged. His other solo keyboard music is held in equally high esteem, especially for its exploration of the strictly contrapuntal fugue; his 48 preludes and fugues (The Well-Tempered Clavier) are still the primary means by which these forms are taught. His other chamber music is similarly lofty, the sets for solo violin and solo cello being the summits of their respective genres.

Bach’s large-scale sacred choral music is also unique in its scope and development. The St. John and St. Matthew passions and B Minor Mass led to the rediscovery of his music in the 19th century. His huge output of cantatas for all occasions is equally impressive. Finally, his large output of concerti includes some of the finest examples of the period, including the ubiquitous Brandenberg Concertos.

© Text by Todd McComb, Rovi

nRP and Nokia E52

What about to listen to nRP (our home based station broadcasting music 24/7) on your Nokia E52 or similar?

First of all you need to setup your Internet connection through your mobile service provider (usually quite expensive!) or a local WLAN1. When you’re done, then you can play around with your Nokia menu following these steps:

MENU → MEDIA → RADIO → RADIO INTERNET → CHOOSE CONNECTION → TURN ON → SEARCH → OPTIONS → ADD STATION MANUALLY → TYPE ADDRESS (http://nrp.selfip.net:8000/) → TYPE STATION NAME (nRP) → SAVE → BACK → FAVORITES → SELECT → LISTEN

From then on, our radio will be on your “Favorites”. So easy when you own a cellphone with radio features. Only a little detail: if you need to connect your Nokia E52 to MAC address protected WLANs, then you need to know your Nokia’s MACs. Follow step 2:

  1. Dial *#2820# to display Bluetooth MAC address
  2. Dial *#62209526# to display the WLAN MAC address

Enjoy our webradio…

  1. Some Wi-Fi points let you connect free. Check it out…

nRP running on Part-Time

Due to technical reasons, current economical crisis and lack of listeners, this station will be broadcasting daily only from 8:00am to 10:00pm. As a matter of fact, keeping on air a station without listeners makes no longer any sense. This solidarity action with the overall poverty in Portugal suits us very well…

May the gods be with us…